Autism and mental health seminar presentations

13 July 2017

Ambitious About Autism, Jack Welch & Georgia Harper – a young person’s perspective: ‘MY NORMAL’

Jack Welch and Georgia Harper presented the findings of their joint research with the Institute of Education about young people with autism's experiences of mental health and wellbeing.

Council for Disabled Children, Christine Lenehan – autism and mental health: REVIEW ON CARE AND SUPPORT

Dame Christine Lenehan’s presented the current state of play, which comes out of work on two reviews looking at outcomes and experiences of children and young people, and a strategic overview of practical action to co-ordinate care, support and treatment for children and young people with complex needs (and behaviour that challenges) involving mental health problems and learning disabilities and/or autism.

National Autism Project, Hilary Gilfoy – FINDINGS FROM THE NAP REPORT

The Shirley Foundation established the National Autism Project in early 2015 and asked Professor Knapp and his team to map the existing evidence base and identify clear research gaps. The report calls for more to be done to shape policy and improve practice in autism. The Autism Dividend: Reaping the rewards of better investment

Reading Universtity, Fiona Knott - Autism and anxiety: LEARNING FROM THE EXPERTS : WHAT DO YOUNG PEOPLE AND THEIR PARENTS TELL  US ABOUT ANXIETY AND ASD?

Fiona Knott, clinical psychologist at the Centre for Autism, Reading University, presented information from focus group studies and videos of young people with autism speaking about their experiences, views of parents of children with autism and anxiety and practical strategies for supporting autism and mental health.

Resources for Autism, Liza Dresner – A lifelong approach: LIFELONG CONDITION, LIFETIME SUPPORT, THE IDEALISTS MODEL

Resources for Autism have been providing practical services for those with a diagnosis of autism of all ages and at all points of the spectrum for nearly 20 years. Liza Dresner’s presentation highlights the importance of acceptance of a lifelong condition, early diagnosis and early intervention and lifelong solutions involving the family, community and school support.